Kimberly Lyon Photography

 
 
 

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Kimberly Lyon

Kimberly Lyon Photography

Casco, WI

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I first began exploring and working with glass in 1989, while employed as a research biochemist in New York. I had always admired many types of glass, including stained, torch-worked and blown, but had focused on science rather than art or craft until this time. My first pieces were created using the copper-foil stained glass methods, learned from a book and, later, videos and experimentation. Kiln-worked glass was beginning to re-emerge as a respected glass art form around this time, and I found it to be an intriguing and less common technique to use to achieve some of the designs I envisioned. At this point, I was just interested in creating glass pieces for myself and as gifts, but friends coerced me into showing my work at art fairs, where it was well received.

When my husband and I moved to Wisconsin in 1992, I left the laboratory behind and opened Ladybug Glass Studio, creating original stained and fused glass items, which have been sold at galleries and art fairs around and beyond the Midwest. I have been commissioned to create many stained glass panels for residences and businesses, as well as kiln-worked pieces for corporate gifts.

Lately, I have found a new direction and have been creating photographic images of my newest kiln-formed glass pieces – “pot melts”. The molten glass flows together to form amazing patterns when viewed with magnification. By selecting the most interesting areas, I am finding new worlds within the glass and enlarge them so all may see.

I love playing with glass – it has so many forms and can be used in so many different ways. The way that light and glass mix is always exciting. I enjoy creating pieces that look completely different in changing light conditions. It is almost as if the glass has a life of it’s own. Often, I have created a piece thinking it will look it’s best with reflected light, only to find that transmitted light coming through it gives at least as wonderful a finish. My goal is to create glass pieces that make people smile.

I first began exploring and working with glass in 1989, while employed as a research biochemist in New York. I had always admired many types of glass, including stained, torch-worked and blown, but had focused on science rather than art or craft until this time. My first pieces were created using the copper-foil stained glass methods, learned from a book and, later, videos and experimentation. Kiln-worked glass was beginning to re-emerge as a respected glass art form around this time, and I found it to be an intriguing and less common technique to use to achieve some of the designs I envisioned. At this point, I was just interested in creating glass pieces for myself and as gifts, but friends coerced me into showing my work at art fairs, where it was well received.

When my husband and I moved to Wisconsin in 1992, I left the laboratory behind and opened Ladybug Glass Studio, creating original stained and fused glass items, which have been sold at galleries and art fairs around and beyond the Midwest. I have been commissioned to create many stained glass panels for residences and businesses, as well as kiln-worked pieces for corporate gifts.

Lately, I have found a new direction and have been creating photographic images of my newest kiln-formed glass pieces – “pot melts”. The molten glass flows together to form amazing patterns when viewed with magnification. By selecting the most interesting areas, I am finding new worlds within the glass and enlarge them so all may see.

I love playing with glass – it has so many forms and can be used in so many different ways. The way that light and glass mix is always exciting. I enjoy creating pieces that look completely different in changing light conditions. It is almost as if the glass has a life of it’s own. Often, I have created a piece thinking it will look it’s best with reflected light, only to find that transmitted light coming through it gives at least as wonderful a finish. My goal is to create glass pieces that make people smile.